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Qutting a part time job in Ohio.

by Jennifer G.
(Toledo, OH)

A couple months back I was discharged from my part time job. I applied for unemployment and it was accepted. I received another part time job shortly after in which I was told I would receive 20 hours a week. I did not receive the 20 hours a week so I continued to apply for partial unemployment. I recently approached management about the reason I am not receiving my 20 hours an if I can be promised an increase in hours. My manager told me I would not go below 15 hours again. I still did not receive many hours and so I picked up a second job. Shortly after that I was approached by management at my first job and it was suggested that because I was so upset about my hours and then a week later I wasn't that maybe we should "part ways". I told them I would stay a couple days a week because I found another job but they still felt that it may be for the best. They were not mean about it but I felt that they wanted me gone. I chose to put in a 2 week notice rather than to be fired from the second job I have ever had. Now I am wondering if I can still receive partial benefits until I receive enough hours at my new job or will I be denied because I quit.

As mentioned before I approached management over this issue and it was not resolved.


Hi Jennifer,

It will depend on whether the state thinks you had good cause for quitting. Is there some specific reason you couldn't have worked both jobs?

You've been a little vague about the reason you quit "rather than be fired from the second job.

Comments for Qutting a part time job in Ohio.

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Apr 16, 2009
Quitting a part-time job and collecting Ohio Partial unemployment.
by: Jenn G.

I told my first part time job that I wanted to work both jobs but they felt that "we should part ways."
I did not want another termination on my resume so I quit. TO top it off, I did not receive any hours that week because they said they did not need me and all my shifts were on call so there was no guarantee.


Hi Jenn,

You just need to be really honest with the state and explain the details.

I'm kinda getting the impression now that you quit because the employer was going to fire you. This might be considered a quit in lieu of discharge .. considering the actions of the employer and not giving you any hours, but instead putting you on an on call basis ..

It's sometimes difficult for me to respond to questions because I unlike the state don't get to hear both sides of the story.

But I do think the details you give need to focus on how this employer was nicely upset that you weren't willing to give up the other job .. especially if you were getting more hours from the other job and the fact that the employer never followed through with the amount of hours promised .. forcing you to pick up another job.

There reaction to this was to not schedule you.




Apr 16, 2009
The difference between quitting in anticipation of being fired and quitting in lieu of being discharged.
by: Jenn G.

Thanks for your advice. You are right about why I quit. I felt I was going to be fired if I did not leave on my own. I told management I would like to stay to work a few days a week, but they still felt it was for the best. My two week notice is up at the end of this week and I plan on telling the state all the events, including the lack of promised hours that lead to me find other work and the possible termination that lead to me resigning. Again thank you for the advice.


Hi Jenn,

Hold on there a moment. If you tell the state the reason you quit was because you thought you were going to be fired .. you'll probably be done for.

That would be a quit in anticipation of discharge and is generally disqualifying.

It's different from a quit in lieu of discharge such as when an employer gives the option of either quit or be fired.

So I'm going to ask you a question .. When you gave your notice .. what exactly prompted you to do so? Was it because the employer wouldn't give you any hours? Was it because the employer put you on call?

If it was because you just didn't want another discharge on your record .. that will not work. You need to focus on a reason "attributable to the work". You need to focus on the fact that the employer said: "I think it's best we part ways". This essentially makes the employer the moving party and could be consider a quit in lieu of discharge.

Even though you gave notice and the employer was so savvy as to let you do this .. when you file for unemployment it's important you make the state understand this. This will allow them to see it for what it really was .. a discharge.

Let me know if you don't understand this. Many, many people end up self-disqualifying their self because they don't understand. They allow their pride or some other misguided notion edit out the important information the state need to allow benefits.

Apr 17, 2009
vague option
by: Jenn G

The employer did not outright say she that she is giving me the choice to quit or be fired. But she kept repeating "maybe we should part ways." I was so flustered at that moment that I said "well if you think that's best..." and she nodded. So I would say that they gave me the chance to quit or be fired. I may have quit anyways after a few weeks anyways because they had no hours to offer me even though I was told a few weeks before that I would receive at least 15 hours. So should I focus more on the lack of hours they were giving me...or should I focus on them giving me an option to quit or to be fired?


You don't seem to sure if this employer would have fired you or not or if they even meant that. If they promised twenty hour upon hire and then failed to give you any hours .. and you picked up another part time job because of this and this is what prompted them to say it's best to part ways .. explain it to the state. They may see the employer's reaction (even though they were not giving you hours) as a discharge anyway.

I think you will just need to explain the situation as to why you gave notice. It's all relevant.

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